Programs

Cochran Fellowship Program

Provides short term U.S. based training opportunities to agricultural professionals from developing and middle – income countries.

The Cochran Fellowship Program provides short-term training opportunities to agricultural professionals from middle-income countries, emerging markets, and emerging democracies. The goals are:

  • to help eligible countries develop agricultural systems necessary to meet the food and fiber needs of their domestic populations; and
  • to strengthen and enhance trade linkages between eligible countries and agricultural interests in the United States.

Approximately 600 Cochran fellows come to the United States each year, generally for 2-3 weeks, to work with U.S. universities, government agencies, and private companies. They receive hands-on training to enhance their technical knowledge and skills in areas related to agricultural trade, agribusiness development, management, policy, and marketing. USDA announces eligible countries and topics each year based on current trade issues.

https://www.fas.usda.gov/programs/cochran-fellowship-program

Borlaug Fellowship Program

Offers mentoring and training to researchers and policymakers from developing countries to help promote food security and economic growth.

The Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program promotes food security and economic growth by providing training and collaborative research opportunities to fellows from developing  and middle-income countries.

Borlaug fellows are generally scientists, researchers, or policymakers who are in the early or middle stages of their careers. Each fellow works one-on-one with a mentor at a U.S. university, research  center or government agency, usually for 8-12 weeks. The U.S. mentor will later visit the fellow’s home institution to continue collaboration. Fellows may also attend professional conferences and events within their field, such as the annual World Food Prize Symposium.

https://www.fas.usda.gov/programs/borlaug-fellowship-program



Quality Samples Program

Helps U.S. organizations provide small samples of their agricultural products to potential customers overseas.

The QSP enables potential customers around the world to discover the quality and benefits of U.S. agricultural products. The program focuses on processors and manufacturers rather than consumers, and QSP projects should benefit an entire industry or commodity rather than a specific company or product. Projects should focus on developing a new market or promoting a new use for the U.S. product.

QSP participants obtain commodity samples, export them and provide the recipient with guidance on how to use the samples. When a project is finished, USDA reimburses the participant for the costs of procuring and transporting the sample. Although all program participants are required to provide technical assistance to the recipients of their commodity samples, the costs for this assistance are not reimbursable.

Any U.S. private or government entity with an interest in exporting U.S. agricultural products may apply to the program. Each year, FAS announces the QSP application period and criteria in the Federal Register. Applicants submit QSP proposals through the Unified Export Strategy (UES) process, which allows eligible organizations to request funding from multiple USDA market development programs through a single, strategically coordinated proposal.

Trade Missions and Shows

FAS sponsored international trade missions open doors and delivers results for U.S. exporters

FAS sponsored international trade missions open doors and delivers results for U.S. exporters, giving them the opportunity to forge relationships with potential customers, gather market intelligence and, most importantly, generate sales.

Each year, FAS endorses the trade shows that will provide the best international exposure and marketing opportunities for the U.S. companies and producers.

FAS works with show organizers and other partners to create a “SA Pavillion” to showcase the variety of quality made-in- America products to potential foreign buyers. FAS also provides participating companies with marketing and promotional services, market intelligence, logistical support, and on-site assistance.



Agricultural Trade Promotion Program

Provides cost-share funding to help U.S. agricultural exporters develop new markets and mitigate the adverse effects of other countries’ tariff and non-tariff trade barriers.

The Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP) will help U.S. agricultural exporters develop new markets and will help mitigate the adverse effects of other countries’ tariff and non-tariff barriers. The ATP provides cost-share assistance to eligible U.S. organizations for activities such as consumer advertising, public relations, point-of-sale demonstrations, participation in trade fairs and exhibits, market research, and technical assistance. The ATP is available to all sectors of U.S. agriculture, including fish and forest product producers, mainly through partnerships with non-profit national and regional organizations. FAS administers the ATP under authorities of the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act.

ATP Regulations

7 CFR Part 1489 – Agricultural Trade Promotion Program

Pima Agriculture Cotton Trust Fund

A fund to reduce economic injury to domestic manufacturers resulting from tariffs on cotton fabric that are higher than tariffs on certain apparel articles made of cotton fabric.

The Pima Agriculture Cotton Trust Fund was authorized under Section 12314 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill) and reauthorized under Section 12602 of the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (the 2018 Farm Bill) to reduce the economic injury to domestic manufacturers resulting from tariffs on cotton fabric that are higher than tariffs on certain apparel articles made of cotton fabric.

The 2018 Farm Bill allocates $16 million in Commodity Credit Corporation funds for each year through 2023 to be distributed as follows:

  • 25 percent to one or more nationally recognized associations established for the promotion of pima cotton for use in textile and apparel goods;
  • 25 percent to yarn spinners of pima cotton that produce ring spun cotton yarns in the United States, to be allocated in accordance with Sec. 12314(b)(2)(A) and Sec. 12314(b)(2)(B); and
  • 50 percent to manufacturers that cut and sew cotton shirts in the United States and that certify that they used imported cotton fabric in during the prior calendar year.


Local and Regional Food Aid Procurement Program

Supports field-based projects that provide development assistance and emergency relief in food-insecure areas using locally procured commodities.

Through the Local and Regional Food Aid Procurement (LRP) Program, FAS is authorized to partner with private voluntary organizations, cooperatives, and the World Food Program to implement field-based projects that provide development assistance and emergency relief using locally procured commodities.

The LRP program complements existing U.S. government food assistance programs, especially the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program, which supports school feeding and maternal and child nutrition projects around the world.

Local and Regional Food Aid Procurement Regulations

7 CFR Part 1590—Local and Regional Food Aid Procurement Program

Applying

For application instructions or to read the full 2019 Notice of Funding Opportunity, please go directly to the Food Aid Information System (FAIS)

The application deadline is May 29, 2019

Fiscal Year 2019 Priority Countries
Burkina Faso
Cambodia
Liberia
Nepal
Nicaragua

International Agricultural Education Fellowship Program

Provides fellowships to U.S. citizens to assist developing countries in establishing school-based agricultural education and youth extension programs.

The International Agricultural Education Fellowship Program will provide fellowships to eligible U.S. citizens to assist developing countries in establishing school-based agricultural education and youth extension programs.

The program was created by Congress in the 2018 Farm Bill to:

  • Develop globally minded United States agriculturists with experience living abroad;
  • Help meet the food and fiber needs of the domestic population of eligible countries; and
  • Strengthen and enhance trade linkages between eligible countries and the United States agricultural industry.

Candidates must hold a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in an agriculture-related field and must understand U.S. school-based agricultural education and youth extension programs.



Dairy Import Licensing Program

Import licensing is one of the tools FAS uses to administer the tariff-rate quota (TRQ) system for U.S. imports of dairy products.

Import licensing is one of the tools USDA uses to administer the tariff-rate quota (TRQ) system for U.S. imports of dairy products. For dairy products subject to TRQs, a license from FAS is generally required to import items at the low-tier tariff rate. Individuals must apply annually for a license between Sept. 1 and Oct. 15.

Under these TRQs, a low tariff rate, called the low-tier rate, applies to imports up to a specified quantity. A higher tariff rate, called the high-tier rate, applies to any imports in excess of that amount.

TRQs replaced Section 22 import quotas for dairy products on Jan. 1, 1995, as a result of the Uruguay Round Agreement. High-tier tariff rates were reduced by 15 percent in the six  years after the agreement’s implementation in 1995, while quantities subject to low-tier rates were increased gradually over that same period. TRQ rates and quantities vary by product.

No license is required to import products at the high-tier rate, to import  products for an agency of the U.S. government, or to import products for personal use, as long as net weight does not exceed 5 kilograms (11 pounds) in any one shipment.

Globalization 2020
Date Country Commodity Note Percent Globalized
April, 2020 Iceland OT –  NSPF 16 100%
SW – Swiss Emmenthaler 25 100%
May, 2020 Israel OT –  NSPF 16 100%
Low Fat 23 100%
May, 2020 Chile Cheddar 18 100%
Blue 17 100%
June, 2020 New Zealand Cheddar 18 100%
American Type 19 100%
OT –  NSPF 16 100%
Low Fat 23 100%
June, 2020 Costa Rica OT – NSPF 16 100%

Regulations

7 CFR Part 46, Subpart – Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing

FileListing of Dairy License Recipients Under Regulation 1 (as of April 13, 2020)

Applying

Eligible individuals must apply annually for a license between September 1 and October 15. FAS issues licenses in late December for the following calendar year.

Embassy Science Fellows Program

Places U.S. scientists at American embassies abroad to provide expertise on issues relating to the environment, science, technology and health.

The Embassy Science Fellows Program places USDA scientists at American embassies overseas to provide expertise, advice, and assistance with issues relating to the environment, science, technology, and health. Since the program’s inception in 2002, FAS has sponsored more than 40 fellows in 25 countries to work in areas of strategic importance to USDA, including trade capacity building, biotechnology, food safety, animal health, and sanitary/phytosanitary issues.



Emerging Markets Program (EMP)

Provides funding for technical assistance activities to promote exports of U.S. agricultural commodities to emerging markets worldwide.

The Emerging Markets Program (EMP) helps U.S. organizations promote exports of U.S. agricultural products to countries that have — or are developing — market-oriented economies and that have the potential to be viable commercial markets.

Through the EMP, FAS provides cost-share funding for technical assistance activities such as feasibility studies, market research, sectorial assessments, orientation visits, specialized training and business workshops. The EMP supports exports of generic U.S. agricultural commodities and products, meaning projects that endorse or promote branded products or specific companies are not eligible.

Each year, FAS announces the EMP application period and criteria in the Federal Register. U.S. non-profit, for-profit and government entities are all eligible to apply. Applicants submit proposals through the Unified Export Strategy (UES) process, which allows eligible organizations to request funding from multiple USDA market development programs through a single, strategically coordinated proposal.

There is no fixed list of “emerging market” countries, but the legislation defines an emerging market as any country that “is taking steps toward a market-oriented economy through the food, agriculture, or rural business sectors of the economy of the country” and “has the potential to provide a viable and significant market for United States commodities or products of United States agricultural commodities.” Guidance on qualified countries is provided each year in the program application announcement.

EMP Regulations

7 CFR Part 1486 – Emerging Markets Program

Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust

Reserve funding to help ensure that the United States can respond to emergency food needs worldwide.

The Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust makes funds available to provide emergency humanitarian food assistance to developing countries. When a food crisis arises and food aid is not available from other U.S. government programs, the Secretary of Agriculture may authorize the release of funds from the trust in order to quickly meet immediate needs. Cash in the trust provides the U.S. government with the flexibility to purchase appropriate U.S. commodities based on availability and specific needs.



Export Credit Guarantee Program (GSM-102)

Guarantees repayment when U.S. banks extend credit to foreign banks to finance sales of U.S. agricultural products.

The GSM-102 program provides credit guarantees to encourage financing of commercial exports of U.S. agricultural products. By reducing financial risk to lenders, credit guarantees encourage exports to buyers in countries — mainly developing countries — that have sufficient financial strength to have foreign exchange available for scheduled payments.

The program is available to exporters of:

  • high-value, consumer-oriented, processed products such as frozen foods, fresh produce, meats, condiments, wine and beer;
  • intermediate products such as hides, flour and paper products; and
  • bulk products such as grains, oilseeds and rice.

More about the GSM-102 Export Credit Guarantee Program

GSM-102 Program Regulations

7 CFR Part 1493 – CCC Export Credit Guarantee Programs Final Rule

PDF icon7 CFR Part 1493 – CCC Export Credit Guarantee Programs (prior to December 18, 2014)

Applying

Already Enrolled?

New to the Program?

  • Once your account is activated, you will be able to access the GSM Online System. Each person in your organization who uses the system must obtain an eAuthentication ID. Please do not share your User ID and password with anyone.

If you have questions about the GSM Online System, email gsm.registrations@usda.gov or call (202) 720-3224.

Scientific Cooperation Exchange Program

Supports collaboration between teams of scientific and technical experts from the United States and the People’s Republic of China.

The Scientific Cooperation Exchange Program supports collaborative relationships between teams of scientific and technical experts from the United States and the People’s Republic of China. Since 1979, the program has facilitated exchanges for more than 3,000 participants on topics including food safety and security, animal and plant health, and agricultural biotechnology and emerging technologies. The program helps to promote U.S. agricultural priorities, encourage long-term cooperation in agricultural science and technology, create a positive atmosphere for agricultural trade, and enhance overall relations between the United States and China. By helping U.S. and Chinese companies understand each others’ products and needs, the program provides an avenue through which U.S. agricultural exports can play a role in the burgeoning Chinese economy.



Scientific Cooperation Research Program

Supports joint research, education, and extension projects between U.S. and international agricultural professionals.

The Scientific Cooperation Research Program supports joint research, extension, and education projects — lasting up to two years — between U.S. researchers and researchers from selected emerging market economies. The projects address issues including agricultural trade and market access, animal and plant health, biotechnology, food safety and security, and sustainable natural resource management. Since 1980, the program has supported more than 400 projects with approximately 95 partnering countries, enhancing the technical skills of more than 1,000 agricultural professionals and helping beneficiary countries to be more competitive consumers of U.S. agricultural products.

Export Sales Reporting Program

Monitors U.S. agricultural export sales to ensure widespread access to up-to-date market information.

The Export Sales Reporting Program monitors U.S. agricultural export sales on a daily and weekly basis.

The program requires U.S. exporters to report sales of certain commodities to FAS each week. Commodities currently covered by the program are wheat, wheat products, barley, corn, grain sorghum, oats, rye, rice, soybeans, soybean cake and meal, soybean oil, cotton, cottonseed, cottonseed cake and meal, cottonseed oil, sunflowerseed oil, flaxseed, linseed oil, cattle hides and skins, beef and pork. FAS publishes a weekly summary of export sales activity every Thursday at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time, unless a change is announced.

In addition to the weekly requirement, daily reporting is required when a single exporter sells 100,000 metric tons or more of wheat, corn, grain sorghum, barley, oats, soybeans, soybean cake or soybean meal, or 20,000 metric tons or more of of soybean oil, to a single destination on a single day. FAS issues a summary of daily sales at 9 a.m. Eastern time on the following business day. Daily sales are also included in the weekly report. (See the latest daily sales reports below, under News.)

Latest Weekly Export Sales Reports

 

Program Regulations

7 CFR, Part 20 – Export Sales Reporting Requirements



Facility Guarantee Program

Provides credit guarantees to support infrastructure improvements in countries where demand for U.S. agricultural products may be limited by lack of adequate facilities.

The Facility Guarantee Program is designed to boost sales of U.S. agricultural products in countries where demand may be limited due to inadequate storage, processing, handling, or distribution capabilities. The program provides credit guarantees to facilitate the financing of manufactured goods and U.S. services to improve or establish agriculture-related facilities in emerging markets.

Under the FGP, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) reduces the financial risk to lenders by guaranteeing payments due from approved foreign financial institutions to U.S. sellers or financial institutions.

Facility Guarantee Program Regulations

7 CFR Part 1493 – CCC Facility Guarantee Program (FGP) Operations

Applying

New to the Program?  Start by submitting the Exporter Qualification Application

Program Parameters

Participants are advised to note the following program parameters and limitations that are referenced in 7 CFR 1493 subpart C.

  • Maximum tenor: 10 years
  • Maximum guarantee coverage (principal): 100% (after deduction of the initial payment)
  • Initial payment percentage: 15%
  • Eligible local costs percentage: up to 30%
  • Eligible interest: the lesser of (1) the interest rate specified between the U.S. financial institution (or seller) and the foreign financial institution; or (2) 80 percent of the average investment rate of the most recent 52-week Treasury bill auction as announced by the Department of Treasury prior to the date the eligible interest rate is established or adjusted. For a given contractual event, the interest rate used to calculate eligible interest will be established as of the date of performance and remain in effect through the first interest and/or principal due date. CCC will adjust that rate as of each interest and/or principal due date. The adjusted rate shall take effect on the day after an interest and/or principal due date and remain in effect though the next interest and/or principal due date. [Note: In the event of any discrepancy between this website and the payment guarantee, the language on the payment guarantee shall prevail.]

Sugar Import Program

U.S. imports of sugar are controlled by a system of tariff-rate quotas (TRQs) with annual quota volumes established by USDA.

Imports of sugar into the United States are governed by tariff-rate quotas (TRQs), which allow a certain quantity of sugar to enter the country under a low tariff. TRQs apply to imports of raw cane sugar, refined sugar, sugar syrups, specialty sugars and sugar-containing products. Import restrictions are intended to meet U.S. commitments under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture (which resulted in the creation of the World Trade Organization).

USDA establishes the annual quota volumes for each federal fiscal year (beginning October 1) and the U.S. Trade Representative allocates the TRQs among countries. Sugar and related products paying a higher, over-quota tariff may enter the country in unlimited quantities.

More information about U.S. trade in sugar and sweeteners is available from USDA’s Economic Research Service.

Regulations

15 CFR Part 2011


USDA also administers three re-export programs involving sugar.

  • The Refined Sugar Re-Export Program is designed to facilitate use of domestic refining capacity to export refined sugar into the world market. The program establishes a license against which a refiner can: export domestically produced refined sugar and later import low-duty raw cane sugar; import low-duty raw cane sugar for refining and distribution to licensed U.S. manufacturers of sugar-containing products and/or licensed producers of polyhydric alcohol for non-food purposes; or import raw sugar, refine it and export it into the world market.
  • The Sugar-Containing Products Re-Export Program is designed to put U.S. manufacturers of sugar-containing products on a level playing field in the world market. U.S. participants in the Sugar-Containing Products Re-Export Program may buy world-priced sugar from any licensed refiners for use in products to be exported to the world market.
  • The Sugar for the Production of Polyhydric Alcohol Program is established to provide world-priced sugar to licensed U.S. manufacturers of polyhydric alcohols. Participating U.S. manufacturers purchase world-priced sugar from licensed refiners for use in the production of polyhydric alcohols, except polyhydric alcohols used as a substitute for sugar in human food consumption.

Regulations

7 CFR Part 1530 – The Refined Sugar Re-Export Program, the Sugar Containing Products Re-Export Program, and the Polyhydric Alcohol Program



Foreign Market Development Program (FMD)

Provides cooperator organizations with cost-share funding for activities that build international demand for U.S. agricultural commodities.

The Foreign Market Development (FMD) Program, also known as the Cooperator Program, helps create, expand and maintain long-term export markets for U.S. agricultural products. Under the program,  FAS partners with U.S. agricultural producers and processors, who are represented by non-profit commodity or trade associations called “cooperators,” to promote U.S. commodities overseas.

The FMD program focuses on generic promotion of U.S. commodities, rather than consumer-oriented promotion of branded products. Preference is given to organizations that represent an entire industry or are nationwide in membership and scope.

FMD-funded projects generally address long-term opportunities to reduce foreign import constraints or expand export growth opportunities. For example, this might include efforts to:

  • reduce infrastructural or historical market impediments,
  • improve processing capabilities,
  • modify codes and standards, or
  • identify new markets or new uses for the agricultural commodity or product.

Each year, FAS announces the FMD application period and criteria in the Federal Register. Organizations apply for the FMD program through the Unified Export Strategy (UES) process, which allows applicants to request funding from multiple USDA market development programs through a single, strategically coordinated proposal. FAS reviews the proposals and awards funds to applicants that demonstrate the potential for effective performance based on a clear, long-term strategic plan.

Directory of Market Development Program Participants

FMD Program Regulations

7 CFR Part 1484 – Programs to Help Develop Foreign Markets for Agricultural Commodities

Technical Assistance for Specialty Crops (TASC)

Funds projects that address sanitary, phytosanitary and technical barriers that prohibit or threaten the export of U.S. specialty crops.

The Technical Assistance for Specialty Crops (TASC) program provides funding to eligible U.S. organizations for projects that address sanitary, phytosanitary and technical barriers that prohibit or threaten the export of U.S. specialty crops. Eligible activities include seminars and workshops, study tours, field surveys, pest and disease research, and pre-clearance programs. Eligible crops include all cultivated plants and their products produced in the United States except wheat, feed grains, oilseeds, cotton, rice, peanuts, sugar and tobacco. Awards are for a maximum of $500,000 per year and for projects of up to five years.

The TASC program is intended to benefit an entire industry or commodity rather than a specific company or brand. U.S. non-profit, for-profit and government entities are all eligible to apply. Proposals may target individual countries or reasonable regional groupings of countries.

TASC Program Regulations

Applying

Applicants may apply via the Unified Export Strategy (UES) process, which allows eligible organizations to request funding from multiple USDA market development programs through a single, strategically coordinated proposal. FAS will also accept applications via email at PODadmin@fas.usda.gov.

FAS reviews the proposals and awards funds on a competitive basis to applicants that clearly demonstrate how their projects will overcome trade barriers and retain or expand market access for specialty crops.

Detailed application information is available here.

File Download application template here.



Faculty Exchange Program

Provides semester-long U.S. training opportunities to university-level agricultural educators from developing countries.

The Faculty Exchange Program enhances the teaching ability of agricultural educators from institutions of higher learning in developing countries. Participants come to the United States for one academic semester (4-5 months) to acquire new knowledge and enhance their ability to teach and build curricula at the university level. Since 1995, the program has provided training opportunities for 377 agricultural educators from 19 countries. Program alumni play an integral role in training the next generation of scientists and policymakers to better understand the global agricultural marketplace and support science-based trade policies.

In 2017, the program will offer fellowships in agricultural economics for Ukraine and veterinary medicine for selected countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

Food for Progress

Provides for the donation of U.S. commodities to help developing countries modernize and strengthen their agricultural sectors.

The Food for Progress Program helps developing countries and emerging democracies modernize and strengthen their agricultural sectors. U.S. agricultural commodities donated to recipient countries are sold on the local market and the proceeds are used to support agricultural, economic or infrastructure development programs.

Food for Progress has two principal objectives: to improve agricultural productivity and to expand trade of agricultural products.

Past Food for Progress projects have trained farmers in animal and plant health, improved farming methods, developed road and utility systems, established producer cooperatives, provided microcredit, and developed agricultural value chains. Program participants have included private voluntary organizations, foreign governments, universities, and intergovernmental organizations.

FAS solicits project proposals each year and provides a list of priority countries. Organizations eligible to apply include foreign governments, intergovernmental organizations, private voluntary organizations, cooperatives and nongovernmental organizations.

Food for Progress Regulations

7 CFR Part 1499 – Food for Progress Program

Applying

For application instructions or to read the full 2020 Notice of Funding Opportunity, please go directly to the Food Aid Information System (FAIS)

The application deadline is July 14, 2020.

FY 2020 Priority Countries & Topics

Bangladesh Trade Facilitation Agreement
Colombia Cacao
Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria
Cashews
Dominican Republic
Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures
Uganda Spices

Wool Apparel Manufacturers Trust Fund

A fund to reduce economic injury to domestic manufacturers resulting from tariffs on wool fabric that are higher than tariffs on certain apparel articles made of wool fabric.

The Agriculture Wool Apparel Manufacturers Trust Fund was authorized under Section 12315 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill) and reauthorized under Section 12603 of the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (the 2018 Farm Bill) to reduce the economic injury to domestic manufacturers resulting from tariffs on wool fabric that are higher than tariffs on certain apparel articles made of wool fabric. The Agriculture Wool Trust is a mechanism for four types of annual payments:

  • Payments to Manufacturers of Certain Worsted Wool Fabrics
  • Payments Under the Monetization of the Wool Tariff Rate Quota
  • Wool Yarn, Wool Fiber, and Wool Top Duty Compensation Payments
  • Refund of Duties Paid on Imports of Certain Wool Products